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Fine Art

Through this website and blog it is my hope to offer news bits about current graphic design challenges (my own and others) as well as fine art news. To continue with the theme of my new book, "Graphic Design Exposed," this blog will expose the development of graphic design and fine art projects. From time to time I will invite guests to blog here in order to keep the news and views fresh and informative.
Please click on the orange and white envelope icon to receive email updates.



Congrats to Aidan for Best in Show

On 24, Feb 2017 | No Comments | In Blog, Fine Art | By Caren Hackman

I’d like to congratulate my talented student, Aidan Skolnick for winning a Best in Show ribbon at this year’s ArtiGras festival in Jupiter, Florida. Aidan has been coming to my studio for just under two years for art lessons. I had the joy of watching this wonderful, mixed-media, piece depicting acrobats unfold over a three week period. Aidan is currently working on a piece inspired by Antoni Gaudí’s nature forms.

Welcome to YogaPainter

On 10, Nov 2016 | No Comments | In Blog, Design, Fine Art | By Caren Hackman

yogapainter-home-screensmblgMany of you know me personally, or through my art and design work. Yoga has been an integral part of my life since November 2010. I have only recently brought these two passions together, in a personal passion project of mine.

I’d like to introduce you to yogapainter.com, my online store, your source for yoga artworks and gifts.

My first GIVEAWAY!

From time to time I’ll be extending special offers to newsletter subscribers and Facebook fans. Please SUBSCRIBE to the YogaPainter newsletter, than visit YogaPainter on Facebook to find out how you can win a package of note cards or a Yoga Expressions 13″ x 19″ scroll.

At YogaPainter you can order Yoga Portraits, Yoga Expressions and note cards.

Yoga Portraits are hand painted original portraits on artist canvas. Great care is taken not only to capture likeness, but also to express the light within every painting subject.

Yoga Expressions are digital paintings. Instead of using a brush directly on canvas, I draw and paint with a digital tablet and stylus. The artworks are printed with high quality archival inks on artist canvas. No two are exactly the same. Each is customized for you, either digitally, or by hand and paint brush.

Both the Yoga Portraits and Yoga Expressions are sent to you ready-to-hang, Asian scroll style. They have wood dowelsupports along the top and bottom edges and hang from a cord. If you prefer to have the an alternative hanging method, please let me know and we’ll make every effort to accommodate you.

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Yoga painter and more

On 22, Oct 2016 | No Comments | In Blog, Design, Fine Art | By Caren Hackman

I’ve been on an unintentional hiatus from this blog since the summer when I had a solo show at Art on Park in Lake Park, Florida. I’ve been very busy working on so many new and fulfilling projects. In addition to wonderful graphic design clients with whom I have the pleasure of working regularly, and a trip to Europe, my yoga based artwork has been keeping me busy (and joyful).  I am excited, too, that one of my yoga artwork paintings, SG Child Pose, was accepted into a show at the Art Gallery of Viera in Melbourne, Florida.

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SG- Child Pose, acrylic on canvas, 29″ x 25″

In the early part of 2017, I plan to open an online store for yoga artworks and gifts.  Check back here for that big announcement towards the end of 2016.

Please visit my Facebook page to vote for your top choice of a card design chosen from the three designs.  Voting will end at 5:00 pm on Wednesday, October 26 when the decision will be made. The winner card design will be printed and delivered to me about 10 days later. https://www.facebook.com/hackman.art/

 If you are interested in purchasing a pack of 6 cards for $10, please contact me directly via phone 561-622-4884 or email caren@yogapainter.com.

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Resource Depot turns waste into wonder

On 10, May 2016 | No Comments | In Blog, Design, Fine Art | By Caren Hackman

Being a guest columnist for The Rickie Report offers  me the opportunity to satisfy my curiosity about many art related community events and institutions. My most recent assignment was to interview Jennifer O’Brien, the Executive Director of Resource Depot. Resource Depot is one of the most creative and FUN waste recycling institutions I’ve ever visited. Below is a short excerpt from my discussion with Jennifer.

I asked Jennifer: What is Resource Depot and how was it started?

Her response: Resource Depot is a nonprofit creative reuse center that has been serving the Palm Beach County community for more than 16 years. In 1999, several influential partners and collaborators in the community joined together to form Resource Depot. Some of those organizations are still involved today, including Children’s Services Council, Solid Waste Authority, United Way of Palm Beach County, the School District of PBC, Florida Power and Light and SunFest.

rd-guerilla We started as an educational and environmental initiative to reduce the amount of waste that was going into the landfill by diverting materials being disposed of that were still reusable. These donated materials from businesses and individuals were collected by Resource Depot and distributed to the educational community, specifically to help stretch the budgets of nonprofit organizations and teachers.

Resource Depot has stayed with that mission. However, since moving to a new, larger location in 2013, in West Palm Beach, the organization has not only expanded its physical footprint, but also expanded our programs and services. Now that we are more centrally located in the county we do more than just provide materials. We provide DIY resources and ideas for projects, host field trips and workshops for students and families as well as show artwork of local “junk artists” in our gallery.

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Many people don’t realize that membership to Resource Depot is open to anyone in the community. Of course, teachers continue to shop here, as well as artists, families, home school moms and other community groups.

Please click here to read the entire article and see more photos.

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Yoga Icons artwork on canvas

On 28, Apr 2016 | No Comments | In Blog, Design, Fine Art | By Caren Hackman

 

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Yoga Icons are now available as hand embellished fine art prints on canvas. Visit Yoga Palm Beach to view three pieces in person. Yoga icon artworks can be ordered by sending in a contact form (CLICK HERE). The artwork can be created in the color scheme of your choice. The ones on display at Yoga Palm Beach are “orange glo namaste” 44” high x 26” wide (in photo with me) and two smaller pieces that are 26” high x 13” wide and are in “orange glo-namaste” and “lavender passion shanti.”  They are all ready-to-hang.

Through my cousin, David Michael Hollander, artist and master yogi, I’ve been learning about the spiritual significance of the number 108 in yoga. Below are three things that I’ve learned about the significance of the number 108.

  1. According to yogic tradition, there are 108 pithas, or sacred sites, throughout India.
  2. There are 108 marma points, or sacred places of the body.
  3. Traditionally, malas, or garlands of prayer beads, come as a string of 108 beads (plus one for the “guru bead,” around which the other 108 beads turn like the planets around the sun). A mala is used for counting as you repeat a mantra. It is similar to the Catholic rosary.

I’ve respected this significant number when pricing the pieces.

Prices: 44” x 26” = $432.00 and  26” x 13” = $162.00

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Pantone Color of the Year

On 19, Apr 2016 | No Comments | In Blog, Design, Fine Art | By Caren Hackman

I’ve always had a strong interest in color. My final thesis paper in college dealt with the relationship between color and consumer choices. While working on the paper, my professor, the chairman of the Syracuse University Industrial Design Department, Arthur Pulos, invited me to work for him at his design consulting agency. I was tasked with choosing the proper color for a new model of stapler in the Ace/Swingline company line of products. My choices were less than thrilling. Offices were indulging in the beige-ing of America at the time. The available selection had to be somewhere between cream color and tan. My job was really to decide which of those subtle shades was least likely to look offensive with the office equipment of the day. Perhaps the decision would have been easier had Pantone begun to select their Color of the Year.

Color_of_the_Year_Rose_Quartz_Serenity_2016_PantonePantone has been selecting a Color of the Year since 2000. The Pantone company, is the world-renowned guru of color and of color systems that are used in technology for the selection and accurate communication across a variety of industries. The Pantone Matching System (PMS) is known worldwide as the standard language for color communication from designer to printer, manufacturer or retailer to  customer. TheColor of the Year choices influence fashion, interior design, industrial design and ultimately advertising.

This year, 2016, for the first time Pantone chose two colors of the year, Rose Quartz and Serenity. The choices, a very soft blue and pink really puzzled me. I decided to research the circumstances and milieu that lead to this decision. 

“Joined together, Rose Quartz and Serenity demonstrate an inherent balance between a warmer embracing rose tone and the cooler tranquil blue, reflecting connection and wellness as well as a soothing sense of order and peace.” stated Leatrice Eiseman, Executive Director, Pantone Color Institute.

Please read the full article on The Rickie Report, “A Behind The Scenes Look At The New PANTONE® Colors”.past-color-choices-sm

Canine art

On 29, Mar 2016 | No Comments | In Blog, Design, Fine Art | By Caren Hackman

I had a blast working on a new piece of art in honor of my sister, Naomi’s, birthday. The piece depicts her dog, Jake, and her sentiments for her beloved canine companion. The work was painted digitally. I sent two versions to Naomi. One is printed on outdoor vinyl banner material. The other is printed with archival ink on fine art canvas.

Many thanks to my canine nephew, Jake, for posing so beautifully. And a big “thank you” to Adam Jeffrey, my human nephew, for taking nearly a dozen reference photos from which I worked.

I enjoyed this so much that I would like to create more. Would you like to have your pet’s image as an art piece?Jake-web

Sharing my passion for communications design

On 22, Mar 2016 | No Comments | In Blog, Design, Fine Art | By Caren Hackman

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Guest, Susan Cooper, with Hackman art card, “Palm Tree Seeds”

Thursday, March 17, I was honored to be the guest speaker at a luncheon hosted by the Boca Raton Branch of the National League of American Pen Women. During the talk I traced my career in industrial design, painting, illustration, graphic design and as author of Graphic Design Exposed (Amazon $9.99). I stressed the importance of good communication design and offered guests many tips for creating their own outstanding communications materials on the web and in print. It was a great pleasure to speak on a subject about which I am so passionate. Please contact me if you would like me to speak to your organization.

“All our members and guests at the luncheon enjoyed your discussion and the information was relatable to all of us. I thought you were one of our best speakers all season,” Carol White NLAPW board member

The National League of American Pen Women was founded in 1897 to promote the development of creative women in the arts. Members include newspaper and magazine writers, screenplay and book authors, sculptors and painters in all media, photographers, public relations and advertising experts, musicians and composers. The Boca Raton Branch routinely reaches out to the community with writing programs and contests, as well as public art shows.

Me with NLAPW member, Dayle Hertsik

Me with NLAPW member, Dayle Hertsik

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Fringed All-Stars Worn by a Real Star

On 01, Mar 2016 | No Comments | In Blog, Design, Fine Art | By Caren Hackman

Nina Lares performing with Dave Schultz at Honey Del Ray 20160219

Thanks to photographer Sandy Schwartz for this great photo of Nina

When Trina Slade Burks told me that the Converse All-Star high tops I embellished with fringe, had sold at the Art Synergy/Continuum auction to benefit Faith’s Place, I was thrilled. I was even more thrilled when I met Nina Lares, the shoes’ new owner. How could I not feel exhilarated? This recent California transplant has an awesome singing voice, an effervescent personality and a great love for the arts. I had an opportunity to hear her sing last Friday evening at Honey in Delray Beach, performing with a group of California musicians led by Dave Schulz, a former band member of the GooGoo Dolls.

Nina’s Jazz Ensemble performed regularly in the Los Angeles area. She is also a makeup artist and along with hairstylist/musician Alfonso Afanador, founded The Factory Hair & Makeup Studio in her former hometown. Named “Best Of” in several of Pasadena’s publications, The Factory is home to both an art gallery & DJ booth – furthering the unique location’s magnetism and chic ambiance.

Welcome to Palm Beach County, Nina!

 

Do Artists Need Special Insurance?

On 16, Feb 2016 | No Comments | In Blog, Fine Art | By Caren Hackman

As a regular columnist with The Rickie Report, an online news source for artists in Palm Beach County and beyond, I interviewed attorney Sheryl Wood. Sheryl has spoken to me in the past about legal issues for artist. In The Rickie Report article Sheryl discussed insurance issues for artists. Below is an excerpt from the article please click here to read the article in its entirety.

CH: Insuring artwork and the contents of my studio makes sense but the task is daunting. Can you help clarify the process?

SW: Looking into insurance coverage for a professional artist is a sound business move. The cost of business insurance is not prohibitive, however, replacing your studio and not being able to work are. You may have a homeowner’s policy if you work in the home, but be sure to read your policy, they typically only provide up to $2500 for business equipment or no coverage at all for business related assets. It is estimated that less than one third of artists have their works covered under business insurance.

There are three types of coverage you may want to consider:

• For Buildings, to cover the physical structure of your studio;
• For your Personal Property, to cover the contents of your studios such as tools, equipment, raw materials, works in progress, finished works, important papers and electronic records; and finally,
• Business Interruption, that covers loss of business income due to time studio is closed for an emergency.
If you can’t afford complete coverage, purchase what you can. Some is better than none. But carefully assess what you need and avoid unnecessary coverage. It is important to insure all works in the studio, including works in progress.

CH: How will the insurance company determine what rates the artist pays and what is covered?

SW: An insurer will determine insurance based on the artist’s stance in the marketplace. What do the paintings, sculptures, or works on paper sell for? If an artist is dealing with a well-established gallery, they should have coverage spelled out in the consignment agreement. However, even some of the established galleries may require artist coverage so they don’t end up covering those losses. Larger insurers typically cover mid-level to blue chip level artists. The reason is that it is easier to underwrite them. An insurance company looks at the way your art is consistently handled. For instance, do you transport your art in a vehicle vs. using a professional shipper and do you make individual miscellaneous sales vs. selling your work through galleries and auction houses.

To see answart-insurance-brushers to the following questions please visit The Rickie Report

  • How would an artist find insurance for his or her artwork?
  • Will an insurance company cover the all of the artist’s works, both finished and works in progress?
  • Could you give me the names of some insurance companies that cover artworks about which you have knowledge?
  • Are there other avenues that an artist might consider when shopping for insurance?
  • How can you be reached if readers have further questions?